How to Make All Natural Beef Tendon Dog Treats

With all the current safety recalls of dog treats, why not make homemade treats for your pet? For those that are concerned about ingredients in the treats they feed their dogs for health, this recipe is a winner! There are only two ingredients, beef tendon and olive oil. Beef tendon is a popular addition to Asian meals and can be easily obtained at your local Asian foods market.



Ingredients & Supplies



You will need; beef tendon, olive oil, a kitchen brush, a good sharp knife, a cutting board, some tin foil and a drying rack/drippings pan combo for the oven. Before you start anything, turn the oven on to it’s lowest possible setting (usually 200F)



STEP 1 – Preparing The Beef Tendon



Tendons naturally occur in pairs. Find the part of the tendon where you can easily pry them apart. Taking your knife, gently fillet the tendons apart.



STEP 2 – Oiling The Tendons



Taking your kitchen brush, lightly coat all the tendons in olive oil. The oil will prevent the tendons from getting overly dry. Place the oiled tendons on the drying rack. Make sure that the drippings pan is coated with tin foil, this will make clean-up easier.



STEP 3 – Baking Time



Place the pan in the middle rack of the oven and let the tendons dry for about 2 hours. The tendons will shrink by about 50% with the drying process.



STEP 4 – The Final Touches



Allow the tendons to cool down for a few minutes and then trim off any excess fat. Cut the tendons into appropriate bite sized pieces for your dog and you’re done! Store these treats in the fridge to prevent spoilage. Shelf life is about two weeks.



Source by Karen Friesecke

Brussels Griffon Puppy And Dog Information

The Brussels Griffon is a lovable, companion dog that does well in a house or apartment. She does require some coat grooming but she is happy, has a big personality and will add joy to most families.

Good With Children?

Not well suited but may be OK with older children as long as they have been socialized with her when she is young.

Good With Other Pets?

Yes.

Temperament

The Brussels Griffon is a lively, cheerful dog full of life and curiosity. She makes a good companion dog but loves to be spoiled. She should be kept in the house with the family but have access to frequent walks for air and exercise.

Trainability

Can be difficult to train. She can be stubborn.

Approximate Adult Size

The approximate adult size (two years old or older) of the Brussels Griffon is 7 to 8 inches to the withers (highest point of the shoulder) and 6 to 12 pounds.

Special Health Considerations

Most dog breeds have certain inherited health problems associated with that specific breed and the Brussels Griffon is no exception. They can have respiratory problems, eye problems (prominent eyes forward to damage), difficulty giving birth, subluxated patella, and her teeth can require care. This disease list is an informative guideline only. Other diseases may also be significant threats, please contact your veterinarian for a complete list.

She should visit the veterinarian several times in the first year for shots, boosters and check up. Then, as an adult, she should visit the veterinarian year for shots and check up. As she gets older, six years and on, she should visit the veterinarian twice a year for check ups and shots. Remember; avoid feeding your dog sweets.

Grooming

The Brussels Griffon has two coat varieties, one being harsh with dense, wiry hair and the other being smooth covered, glossy and short. She should be brushed regularly. Brushing will help her maintain a clean and healthy coat, avoid mats and help you keep a close eye on her health and strengthen your emotional bond with her.

Her teeth should be brushed at least twice a week with toothpaste and toothbrush designed for dogs. Brushing removes the accumulation of plaque and tartar which can cause cavities (rarely) and periodontal disease. Dog periodontal disease can lead to pain, loss of teeth, bad breath and other serious disease.

Her toenails may need to be examined for growth and clipped regularly. The toenails of the rear feet grow slower than the toenails of the front feet. Generally a guillotine type trimmer is the best for this chore and competent instructions to accomplish this can be found on the net.

Life Span

The Brussels Griffon can live between 8 and 10 years with proper nutrition, medical care and excellent living conditions.

History

The Brussels Griffon comes from Belgium. They were developed from the Affenpinscher, Ruby English Toy Spaniel and the Dutch Pug. They cam to America in mid 1880. They were first registered by the American Kennel Association in 1910.

Some Registries

  • American Brussels Griffon Association.
  • UKC United Kennel Club
  • NKC National Kennel Club
  • CKC Continental Kennel Club
  • APRI Americas Pet Registry Inc.
  • AKC American Kennel Club
  • FCI Federation Cynologique Internationale
  • NZKC New Zealand Kennel Club
  • KCGB Kennel Club of Great Britain
  • ANKC Australian National Kennel Club
  • ACR American Canine Registry

Litter Size

1 to 3 Brussels Griffon puppies

Category

Toy

Terms To Describe

Independent, active, intelligent, stubborn, bluffer

SPECIAL GOOD POINTS

  • Intelligent.
  • Good watch dog.
  • Loves to be part of the family.
  • They are so human like that they are sometimes called monkey face.

SPECIAL BAD POINTS

  • Can be stubborn.
  • May have problems being obedient.
  • Not a guard dog.
  • Does not like cold weather.
  • May be difficult to housebreak,
  • They can tend to be barkers.

Other Names Known By

Briffon Belge, Griffin Bruxellois, Belgian Griffon, Griff, Brussels, monkey face

Every dog ​​is an individual so not everything in this information may be correct for your dog. This information is meant as a good faith guideline only.



Source by Mitch Endick

Tips for Holiday Travel With Your Pet

Most people travel for their holiday celebrations and they usually take their family with them. There are some that just can not live without their pets as well. If you intend to travel with your pet you have to plan ahead to make the journey pleasant and comfortable for both you and the animal.

· Traveling by Car

If you are going for a road trip for the holidays, make sure that you do not let the pet loose inside your vehicle. You can get your pet a safety harness that can be attached to your car's seat belt system. Or you can just put your pet in a cage. A pet carrier is also a good idea, but could be more expensive too. Always put your pet in the back seat.

· Traveling by Air

If you are flying to your destination, a pet carrier is a must to comply with airline regulations. Check with the airlines regarding the pet carrier dimensions to ensure that you will be buying the right-sized one. A pet can travel by air in the cabin if it does not exceed 22 pounds in weight, 18 inches in length and 11 inches tall.

For international traveling, you will need certain documents for your pet before you can take it with you. It would best if you can give at least 6 weeks permission to start taking care of the papers.

Do not travel with your pet unless you have it checked and vaccinated by the veterinarian. Always carry your pet's current health certificate along with the record of vaccinations.

· Pet Foods

Take plenty of pet foods; you can never be sure if your pets' favorite brand of pet foods will be available at your destination, so it is better to be sure.

· Feeding Instructions

If you are flying, feed your pet with a light snack 5 to 6 hours before departure. Do not give your pet any liquid 2 hours before departure. If you are going by the car, try not to feed your pet while you are moving.

· Put ID Tags

Whether you are taking your pet for domestic or international traveling, it is best if you can attach an ID tag to your pet. The ID tag must contain your home address and telephone number as well as your destination's address and telephone number.

Before you take off it is also important to check if your pet is going to be welcome at your destination. If you are visiting relatives, you need to let them know that you will be bringing your pet. If you are staying at a hotel, check about the accommodation's rules and regulations regarding pets.

Also make sure that your pet is travel-ready. Animals can be more fidgety than kids during long journeys. If your pet has never been anywhere else but home, you can start making him travel-ready by taking him to the supermarket, the park or at the mall.

Finally, try to be as patient as possible. You need to understand that you are not going to deal with your pet alone; you are also going to have to deal with other people's reaction to your pet.



Source by Samantha M Jacobsen

Hamster Breeding Made Easy

How many children do you have in your family? How big is your house? The more children you have, the more space is required. If there are too many people in a small house, everyone will feel uncomfortable. This is also true with hamsters. Once you decide to breed hamsters, you have to ensure that you can easily find new homes for the babies, or you will need to get enough cages to house the litter. Before you start breeding, you can talk to local pet shops or to friends, relatives, and co-workers to determine if they are willing to take some of the baby hamsters.

Cross breeding you should not be attempted. For instance, if you like Syrian hamsters, you will need to breed two Syrian hamsters. What if you only have a female or a male? This is not a problem. You can find another owner of a hamster of the same breed. Ask around your neighborhood or you can also ask for references from friends and acquaintances. Talk to the owner of the hamster and you can bring them with the agreement of sharing the load when it comes to finding homes for the babies!

The Syrian hamsters are more of the 'isolated' type and will want to live alone or in pairs. The dwarf hamsters are different. In fact, you can keep a few dwarf hamsters (of the same sex) in a cage, and they will tend to live harmoniously as they grow up together. Remember that once you've determined the gender of the hamsters, you will need to keep them in separate cages – one for the male and one for the female. You see, when the hamsters reach the 'mating' age, you can see how things unfold naturally.

To prevent cannibalism, you need to breed the females when they are already 4 to 6 months. It's not ideal to breed hamsters over six months old because birth complications can occur. In the case of the male, the ideal age for breeding is 2 to 3 months old. Here's another fact, the female becomes sterile when she reaches 14 months! So if you want to breed again using the same female, you can do so but try to space the births 3 to 4 months apart.

Some females get pregnant within several days of giving birth, but this is not ideal because it will only shorten their lives. This is because the female's body is not able to recuperate. In most cases, the female can produce two litters at certain time intervals, although there is a chance when she can produce more than that.

When promoting the Syrian, the female is really aggressive and so you will need to introduce the male when they are in season. Watch out for the scent that is usually given off at night by the female. This is the sign that she is ready to mate. Otherwise, the male can get killed. You need to learn about the oestrus period of the female which can last for 4-18 hours beginning at night. Learn the scent and know how it smells.

Feed the female with foods that are high in protein during her pregnancy. After giving birth, your task is to avoid upsetting the mother, and refrain from disturbing their cage. In other breeds, like the dwarf hamsters, you will not encounter many problems because these creatures are more sociable.

Good luck and happy hamster breeding!



Source by Marc Stonebright

A Senior Dog Health Management – Rich Diet, Exercise, Vet Checkups & Supplements

As humans, your dog too ages and it is relatively earlier than a humans age. With age, numerous health issues arise in your dog such as deterioration of skin and coat, loss of muscle mass, digestion issues, obesity, arthritis, dental problems and decreased ability to fight back infections. However, large size dogs experience age-related changes earlier compared to smaller dogs who live longer. This gives us the hint to estimate when it is a time to feed your canine a senior diet food based on the size.

A standard guideline to follow to determine how dogs age related to their size is:

  • Small breeds or dogs weighing less than 20 pounds – 7 years of age.
  • Medium breeds and dogs weighing 21 to 50 pounds – 7 years of age.
  • Large breeds and dogs weighing 51 to 90 pounds – 6 years of age.
  • Giant breeds and dogs weighing 91 pounds or more – 5 years of age.

Say no to diets that have low level of proteins

Normally, it is believed that as dogs age, they require less amount of proteins. This is far behind the real fact. Senior dogs require as much protein as they were taking previously. Studies have proven that older dogs need to be facilitated with proper level of proteins, and this does not open gateways to the development or progress of renal failures. It is even crucial to feed senior dogs with optimal levels of easily digestible proteins to help retain good muscle mass.

Ensure to Provide Low-Calorie Diet

Senior dogs have been recorded to attain an extra body fat in spite of consuming fewer calories. Due to the age, this change in a body is unstoppable and may be triggered due to reduced energy spending or a sudden change in metabolism. Whatever the reason is, it is paramount to feed a low-calorie diet to avoid every possible weight gain and the problems arising due to obesity. However, meeting the proper protein level is important to support in retaining muscle mass.

Talk to your vet regarding the change of diet of your older dog

Aging can directly affect a dog's intestinal function. It can hamper intestinal bacteria, which can surface the symptoms of gastrointestinal infections. When selecting a senior dog diet, ensure it contains FOS (fructooligosaccharides) that promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria, this invariably helps in proper digestion, preventing any digestive issues.

Pick foods with high ratio of vitamin E and Beta-carotene

Antioxidants such as vitamin E and beta-carotene help in removing free radicals that can seriously damage the tissues of the body and can cause signs of aging. Senior dog diets should contain higher levels of these antioxidant compounds. Good amount of antioxidants is responsible for increasing the effectiveness of the immune power in older dogs.

Stick to Consistency

Never be inconsistent when it comes to a routine care of geriatric pets. Along with consistent daily routine, timely veterinary examinations should be involved to diagnose the presence or progress of a chronic disease. Stressful situations and abrupt changes in daily routines should be shunned. In case, you are looking to make a drastic change in your older pet's routine, remember to put it on a regular scale.

In a nutshell, senior dogs undergo a variety of physiological changes along with psychological changes. To tackle these changes, it is advisable to follow the right diet that is recommended for older dogs. Two things to care – their weight and agility. Your older dogs need not only proper diet and optimal weight but also regular health checkups at a vet office. Not limited to this, the care should be extended in adding the nutritional supplements to aid their physical health. Well, taking proper care of your older dog, you can help them pass their golden years happily.



Source by Taya Burnett

Ten Little Known Facts About Cats

While cats are counted as the most-owned pet in the U.S., dogs still receive more attention from their owners. This might be attributed to the fact that most people don’t know very much about cats and thus, have no idea what kind of attention they need. Cats are regarded as aloof and independent and so, require less attention. Cats can take care of themselves in ways dogs cannot, but this does not mean they prefer to be left alone.

  1. They need as much attention as dogs. Cats are emotionally sensitive and need companionship, too. If we ignore them, they learn to be aloof, but they’d rather be affectionate.
  2. Cats can be trained to do many things, including walk on a leash, “speak,” beg, sit, lie down, etc. It just takes different training methods and lots of patience.
  3. The average lifespan is about 15 years, but it can be much longer with good care. A stray might manage to survive two years in harsh surroundings, but a well-cared-for pet cat can easily attain 20 years.
  4. Fossil records have shown that cats have been around for more than 35 million years, without much change in their shape or behaviors.
  5. As long as a space or an opening is not smaller than their heads, cats can squeeze through them, because their skeletal structure is narrow at the shoulders and the clavicle and shoulder blades (that give humans their wide shoulders) are very narrow and rotate easily. It is incorrect to say that cats do not have shoulder blades.
  6. A cat’s whiskers are essential equipment for analyzing their environment and can be moved in independent groups with the many tiny muscles that control them. They can detect the slightest air movements, which can help with hunting small prey. Blind cats hold them forward, using them much as a blind person uses a cane.
  7. Their ears also are controlled by many more muscles than humans have. Cats can move their ears over 180 degrees using the 30 or so muscles they have, compared to only 6 for humans.
  8. A cat’s jaws move only up and down; there is no sideways movement. This means they cannot grind their food. They can only chomp down on it. This means that so-called dental treats or chew toys are ineffective, therefore, they need to have their teeth cleaned fairly regularly.
  9. Allergies to cats involve a skin secretion called “sebum,” rather than hair, saliva, fur or dander, as many believe. Thus, a hairless cat is not really hypoallergenic, and those breeds require frequent bathing to control it. They also require more skin care for protection, since hairlessness is not natural.
  10. Cats have better hearing than dogs. Humans can hear up to 20 kilohertz, cats are at about 65 KHz, and dogs are somewhere in between, depending on breed and health.



Source by Dr. R.J. Peters

The Advantages of Adopting an Adult Dog

Christmas has come and gone, but now, families are dealing with a problem that came from something that they thought would be a happy memory. What was under the christmas trees? Many children found a small, wiggly present just for them. As they pulled off the lacey bow, they breathlessly held back in anticipation, knowing that it may not be what they have been wishing for all year. Then they heard the little whine that could only mean one thing, a puppy with soft, fluffy fur, and a cute wiggly tail. An hour goes by before the children thought of him again; but by then, it was too late. He urinated on the rug and chewed on two pairs of shoes. This is the story that follows the opening of the small, wiggly present. Many parents do not realize how much responsibility a puppy can be, but by adopting, an adult dog will help keep the puppy frustrations away.

There are many benefits to adopting an adult dog, rather than a puppy. First, the cost of adoption is cheaper than buying a puppy. The adoption fee will also include medical care like spaying, neutering, and vaccinating. It is very unlikely that medical cost will be included in a contract when buying a puppy. In addition, the experts at rescue centers and humane societies can help families pick out the right kind of dog. The Humane Society of the United States writes that they will “[…] screen animals for specific temperaments and behaviors to make sure each family finds the right pet for its lifestyle.” Most importantly, when adopting a dog, there will be no financial support going to puppy mills, or pet stores that support puppy mills. “Puppy mills are ‘factory style’ dog-breeding facilities that put profit above the welfare of dogs”.

While the adoption of puppies is important, the adoption of an adult dog is the key to having a stress free home. A dog becomes an adult between ten and eighteen months. The smaller breeds of dogs will mature faster than larger breeds. A dog becomes a senior and can start showing his age at seven years, and can live between thirteen and eighteen years. This means that a young adult dog can still have a lot of life to give a family.

All puppies will need to be trained for about a year. The first thing puppies will need to learn is not to urinate in the house. This process is called housebreaking or potty training. There are many ways to potty train a puppy, but all of these techniques require time, patience, and a good carpet cleaner. Puppies have very small bladders. The younger the puppy, the smaller its bladder will be. This means that it cannot keep from urinating for more than fifteen minutes at a time. As the puppy gets older, its bladder will become larger, allowing it to wait for longer periods of time. However, this still means that there will be midnight potty training sessions. In contrast, “adult dogs are likely to be already housebroken. If they’re not, they do have the physical capacity to hold it in (unlike puppies) and are generally fast-learners.

Puppies will also need to be watched. They should never be left alone for more than thirty minutes at a time. They will chew on anything, including shoes and expensive furniture. All puppies go through a teething phase, just as human babies do. This phase is their way of testing their environment, and a way for them to pull out their puppy teeth. This puppy phase can cost hundreds of dollars in damages. Deborah Hoffman writes, “…one chewed the wooden molding in our kitchen, and another destroyed hundreds of dollars of irrigation. The ten-month old managed to eat an entire foam chair (yuck!) and liked tearing chunks out of our berber [sic] carpet when we weren’t looking”. Once again, puppies will require time and patience to teach them what not to chew on. However, adult dogs have already explored their world and have lost all of their puppy teeth. They have no more reasons for chewing on non-food items.

Lastly, when adopting an adult dog, “Their personality is already developed, and you’ll be able to spot the characteristics you’re looking for much more easily than with a puppy or kitten” says Pia Salk from adopt-a-pet.com. This means knowing most of the dog’s behaviors before bringing them home. For example, does it like to curl on the couch and cuddle or does it like to be in its kennel (for owners that may need to kennel their dogs while they are at work). This also includes knowing some of the bad behaviors a dog might have, such as, does it get along well with other dogs or is it food aggressive. Some owners are better equipped to handle these problems than others are. Buying a puppy before knowing its personality can mean disaster for a family, after the puppy becomes an adult dog. Will it still fit in with the family? Will the children still like to play with the puppy after it is all grown up? Questions like these do not need to be asked when adopting an adult dog.

Bringing a new dog into a family can be either very rewarding or very frustrating. Always choose carefully when picking out a new family pet. Puppies are fun, but can be destructive. Does the bank account have the extra funds it will take to care for the puppy financially? There are so many adult dogs waiting to be adopted that could fit into a family perfectly. Check out an adoption center today.



Source by Penny Mansfield

Three Tips to Choosing the Right Webkinz For You

Plush furry little adorable toys otherwise known as Webkinz have become a rage and every kid must have at least one. Each pet comes with a special code which lets you access the Webkinz World website and play with your pet virtually.

Adoption of your pet is essentially giving you full authority to do whatever you want with your Webkinz. You can feed the animal, buy clothes for it, earn extra kinzcash and play a host of games at Webkinz World.

Webkinz were a huge hit with children but in the beginning they could only be found in a few stores. By the end of the year, however, there was a mad rush to own Webkinz products and soon stores were running out of stock.

Some of these Webkinz animals become rare and prices are hiked up by a huge margin. To give your child the very best and latest Webkinz you must buy them quickly before they become really expensive.

You want to get your child his or her favorite pet? Well then just ask them to make a list of all those Webkinz animals that they love but do not own. Make a mental note to add all the accessories that come along with these plush toys. This small gesture makes the toy more personal than ever before. Now simply go to the store and check with the shopkeeper if any of those toys are available. If the toy or toys are there buy it that very instant. This is the most hassle free way to get your child’s most liked pet or pets.

Make sure you do your homework before you set out to purchase your Webkinz pet. Find out the cheapest available price online and don’t forget to include shipping charges along with it. Some may propose free shipping if a purchase is made over a certain amount. However on auction websites sellers usually charge you for every part you buy but that balances out the little money you save otherwise.

Keep your eyes wide open for any toys that are likely to go into retirement. If you spot any Webkinz of that kind buy it on the spot. Retired Webkinz are extremely expensive and the price just keeps rising for instance the ‘cheeky dog’ which is believed to have been sold for a four digit figure.

For More information, please visit: Webkinz Cheat Codes and Webkinz Cheats



Source by Dixita Dutt

All About The Yorkshire Terrier AKC Standard

In 2006, Yorkshire Terriers became the second most popular purebred dog in America. The year before, they had been number three. Although it seems hard to think that any breed of dog would topple the long reigning Labrador Retriever from the top spot, the tiny Yorkshire Terrier seemed poised to do just that. Wondering if you have ever seen a Yorkshire Terrier (most commonly called Yorkies)? Chances are, you have seen a lot of them.

Yorkshire Terriers weigh only about six pounds, although they can get heavier or lighter without being ill in any way. They have pointed ears, a tiny pointed nose and a yappy voice. They are most common in blue and gold coats, although a there are slight variations in color the blue and gold dominate. These coats naturally grow long and silky, getting to be almost twice the length of the dog, requiring that tiny red bow in top so the dog can see.

The personality of a Yorkshire Terrier is pretty consistent, even though you will find some differences in individual dogs. There is a temperament goal in the Yorkshire breed standard that ethical breeders try to get their dogs to copy. Yorkshire Terriers are the benevolent Napoleons of the canine world, needing to be in charge of every little thing in their territory. They are bossy, vocal and need to be fussed over.

The breed standard lists Yorkies as alert, vivacious and full of "self importance". (That's putting it mildly). Yorkies are one of the few dog breeds that can be picky eaters. They make very good watchdogs. They do not do well in a home with pet rodents, as they were bred to kill rats. However, they do well in homes with older or small children. In a home with other dogs, do not be surprised if the Yorkie becomes the alpha dog very quickly.

Other distinct features of the Yorkshire Terrier include a black nose, a yappy voice and a bold personality. Unlike a sloping spelling of, say, a German Shepherd, Yorkies have even spines with the shoulder in line with the rump. They should stand squarely. Although blue and tan is the official color, other colors or white markings have cropped up in pet quality animals.

Yorkshire Terriers are famous for their silky coats. In show champions, the coat is about twice as long as the dog. In the shelter, most likely the dog you are trying to identify has a clipped coat, making him or her look like a cross between a teddy bear and a ragamuffin. Another fault that disables a Yorkie from a show ring is having black hairs mixed with the blue and tan. Also, if the blue of your Yorkie is silver blue instead of steel blue, he or she will also not be considered good enough for the show ring.



Source by Susan Bailey

Dog Sense – How To Give Your Dog Freedom

I am a professional dog trainer. As such I have a very specific way that I view dogs and how I think about dog training. I refer to this as my 'dog-sense'. When I encounter new clients I discover them with varying degrees of dog-sense. It is my responsibility as a trainer to inculcate as much dog-sense into my clients as possible.

Through my years of training I have found that the majority of dog owners lack dog-sense in one key and critical area. If dog owners everywhere were able to improve in this area it could very well put me out of a job.

Dogs have dozens of natural instincts. A great deal of these instincts act out in contradiction to what the average dog owner wants. Dogs instinctively pee on rugs, jump on newcomers, bark at things, and chew on whatever feels comfortable.

It remains the responsibility of the dog owner to mold every dog ​​behavior. It is your responsibility to determine how your puppy or dog interacts with your sofa, with your rug, with your guest, with your child, and with every part of your dog's surroundings. This is where the average dog owner goes wrong.

The average dog owner Merely hands over freedom to his dog. This is a mistake. Dogs need to earn their freedom through good behavior. You can not allow your dog to be loose in your house until he has learned how not to go to the bathroom on the floor, how not to chew on your shoes, and how not to make a wreck of everything. Every time a dog owner gives a dog freedom too early he runs the risk of the dog taking that freedom and acting inappropriately with it. If you give your dog freedom and he pees on the floor what can you do? The answer is nothing. You can not find a problem after the fact and do anything about it.

So what is a dog owner to do? The answer is that you are to restrict your dog's freedom until he has earned it. Keep your dog with you. If you want to mold behavior you have to see behavior. If you want to see your dog's behavior your dog has to be next to you. So keep your dog with you at all times. Do not let your dog out of your sight until you can trust him. If you can not keep him in your sight because you leave the house or are too busy, put your dog in his crate.

As your dog progresses and is reliable in the house you can give him more and more freedom. Do not rush it. Take your time and you will see that your dog can learn to be a perfect pet in the home.



Source by Tyler Brown